Meetings

Meeting Agendas | Meeting Minutes  | By-Laws  | Robert’s Rules

Welcome to our meetings page! Here is our annual meeting schedule:

Annual Meeting: Third Thursday of March
Summer Meeting: Third Thursday of June
Fall Meeting: Third Thursday of October

Note that we will be having our meetings exclusively online using Zoom from here on out unless stated otherwise in writing by President Doug Elwell. All official meeting notifications will be posted on our website.

Zoom Link:
Click the link below to access our Zoom meeting:

https://zoom.us/j/3293763998

Meeting ID: 329 376 3998

Dial by your location
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/ac3FnDF5CH

Downloading & Installing Zoom:
You may need to install the Zoom application, clicking the Zoom link above will guide you on how to do that, or you can download the app here: https://zoom.us/download and follow the directions to install. Zoom is available for both desktop computers and mobile devices.

All meetings fall on the third Thursday of March, June, or October, except special meetings which can occur any time, subject to the President’s discretion. Note that only the President can call a meeting — regular, special, or otherwise — and any other meetings that are not managed by the President are not legal, and no votes, decisions, statements, agreements, or anything else that takes place during a meeting that is not managed by the President are not legally binding in any way.


Meeting Agendas

2022

Spring 2022 Meeting Agenda

2021

Fall 2021 Special Meeting Agenda
Fall 2021 Meeting Agenda
Summer 2021 Meeting Agenda
Spring 2021 Meeting Agenda

Meeting Minutes

2021

Fall 2021 Meeting Minutes
Summer 2021 Meeting Minutes
Spring 2021 Meeting Minutes


By-Laws

BHA By Laws: Revised June 17, 2021


Robert’s Rules of Order

The Butterfield Homeowners Association uses the latest version of Robert’s Rules of Order (12th Edition as of September 1, 2020), to manage our meetings. Note that in order to raise a motion, you must first ask permission from the meeting chair (the President) to speak. If he wants to allow you to speak, he will call you by name to recognize you as having been given permission to speak. Otherwise you must not speak. If you speak anyway, you will be considered out of order and your statement will not be entered into the official meeting minutes. If you continue to be out of order, it is possible that you will be asked to leave the meeting, so please make sure to respect the chair and follow the rules. When meeting in person, requesting permission to speak is done by raising your hand, and when meeting online, requesting permission to speak is done by sending the chair a request to speak using Zoom’s chat application.

Here is some useful summary information to help you understand the basics of parliamentary procedure:

Online Meeting (Zoom) Rules:
In order to make it easier to communicate more efficiently with the large number of people attending online, instead of speaking, you can submit your motion via the chat application provided by Zoom.

Below is a more detailed explanation of how meetings are run using Robert’s Rules of Order:


HOW DECISIONS ARE MADE AT A MEETING: HANDLING MOTIONS

A. THE MEANING OF “MOTION”
The primary purpose of the sort of meeting that uses rules of order is for the group to make decisions. It may decide on anything from taking a position on a major public issue to organizing a pet show. To begin the process of making any decision, a member offers a proposal by making a motion. A motion is a formal proposal by a member, in a meeting, that the group take certain action. [RONR (12th ed.) 3:22.]

A main motion is one whose introduction brings business before an assembly. Strictly speaking, there should be no debate on a matter before a motion regarding it has been made. Only one main motion may be before the assembly for action at a time. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:7–8, 6:1, 10:1.]

B. HOW YOU GET TO SPEAK AT A MEETING
In order to make a motion or to speak in debate, you use the same procedure: You stand up immediately after the previous speaker has finished and call out “Madam President,” “Mr. Chairman,” or whatever the chair’s title may be. The chair designates you as the next speaker, or recognizes you, normally by calling out your name or title, saying, for example, “Mr. Jackson,” or “The delegate from Clayton County,” or sometimes (in a small meeting) simply by nodding to you.

When you are authorized to speak in this way, you are said to have the floor. When finished, you sit down, and thus yield the floor.


Example: Getting Recognized to Speak

MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: It’s not a very good idea to…. [Sits when finished speaking.]


C. HOW A MOTION GETS BEFORE A GROUP

1. How to Make a Motion
To make a main motion, after obtaining the floor you simply say, “I move that …” and then clearly describe the proposal. For example, “I move that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools.”

It is very important to say precisely what the words of the motion are to be. The group votes on exact language, not on a vague idea. In the end, each motion has to be written down in the minutes. It is the secretary’s job to copy the motions down accurately—not to come up with language he or she thinks is what the group or the mover meant.

The chair can require that main motions be submitted by the mover in writing. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:18.]

In fact, it is a good practice to write out any motion you propose and make copies to give to both the president and the secretary. A long or complex motion should always be written out and handed to the secretary.

After making a motion, you immediately sit down. You wait until later to give your reasons for making the proposal. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:4–8.]


Example: Making a Motion

MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: I move that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. [When finished making the motion, be seated. Wait until later to explain why the motion is a good idea.]


2. “Seconding” a Motion
When one member has made a main motion, it must be seconded in order to be considered by the group. This shows that at least two members want the proposal considered; it does not necessarily mean the seconder agrees with the motion. If there is no second, the motion is not put before the group for discussion or decision.

To second a motion, you call out “Second!” You may remain seated, and you do not have to be recognized by the chair to second a motion. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:9–14.]

3. The Chair “States” the Question
When a motion has been moved and seconded, the chair then states the question on the motion. To “state” a motion, the chair simply says, “It is moved and seconded that” and then repeats the exact words in which the motion was made. For example: “It is moved and seconded that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools.”

The chair must state the question on a motion after it is moved and seconded for it to be properly before the group for consideration, for at least two reasons.

First, it is important that everyone in the group be able to know exactly what proposal is before it. By repeating the exact language of the motion, the chair helps everyone to hear it clearly, and calls everyone’s attention to the fact that a new proposal is now ready to be considered.

Second, the chair has two duties, before stating any motion:

a) The chair must determine that the motion is in order at the time. If the motion in some way violates the rules, the chair does not state the motion, but instead says, “The chair rules that the motion is not in order because….”1 (The rules that govern when motions are in order will be described later.)

b) The chair must ensure that the motion is clearly phrased. If the motion is unclear, the chair should help the mover to reword it before stating it. [See pp. 138–39 of this book; RONR (12th ed.) 4:15–24.]


Example: Making, Seconding, and Stating a Motion

MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: I move that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. [When finished making motion, sit. Wait until later to explain why motion is a good idea.]
ANOTHER MEMBER [Seated]: Second!
CHAIR: It is moved and seconded that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools.


D. HOW THE GROUP CONSIDERS A MOTION

1. Debate on the Motion
When a main motion has been stated by the chair, it is said to be pending—or, commonly, “on the floor.” It is then before the group for debate and action. Debate means discussion on the merits of the question—that is, whether the proposed action should or should not be taken.

Right after stating the question on a motion, the chair normally turns toward the maker of the motion to see if he or she wishes to be assigned the floor. The next chapter tells more about debate, including how to limit it or end it altogether.


Example Debate:

MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: We need to bring young people into tennis to keep the sport alive. . . . [Sits when finished.]
MEMBER B [Stands after Member A sits]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mrs. B.
MEMBER B: Most of our members are adults. High school students should establish their own league. . . . [Sits when finished.]


During debate, there are also certain other motions that you may make relating to the main motion’s consideration, or, in some cases, interrupting its consideration. These are called secondary motions. For example, a motion to Recess, described in Chapter 2, is a secondary motion that interrupts. The most common secondary motion that relates to a pending motion is a motion to Amend it, which we will cover in Chapter 5. We will cover some other secondary motions later on; they are all treated in RONR. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:27–33, 5:3–7.] 2.

The Chair “Puts” the Question
When no one else seeks recognition to debate, the chair may ask, “Are you ready for the question?” (or “Is there any further debate?”) This means, “Is everyone in the group ready to vote on the proposal immediately, or does anyone first want to speak about it, or offer amendments or other motions related to it?” Then—if there is still no effort to get the floor for further debate—the chair stands and puts the question to a vote. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:34.]

To do so, the chair begins by saying, “The question is on the adoption of the motion that …” and then repeats the exact wording of the motion to be voted on: for example, “The question is on the adoption of the motion that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools.”

The chair then gives the necessary directions for the group to vote on the motion. Most motions require a majority of those present and voting to pass. Some require a two-thirds vote.

(Abstentions—instances in which members who are present do not vote—are not counted and have no effect on the result.)

The simplest and most common type of voting is the voice vote. The chair says, “Those in favor of the motion, say aye.” Those in support, remaining seated, then call out “aye.” The chair then says, “Those opposed, say no.” The opponents, also seated, call out, “no.” The chair judges whether more people called out “aye” or “no” and, based on this judgment, proceeds to announce the result of the vote. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:34–40.]


Example: Putting the Question
CHAIR: The question is on the adoption of the motion that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. Those in favor of the motion, say aye.
SOME MEMBERS [Seated]: Aye!
CHAIR: Those opposed, say no.
OTHER MEMBERS [Seated]: No!


3. The Chair Announces the Result of the Vote
When the voting is complete, the chair announces the result. Each announcement has three parts:

1) reporting which side “has it”;
2) declaring that the motion is adopted or lost; and
3) indicating the effect of the vote, if needed or appropriate.

Immediately after announcing the result of the vote, the chair announces the next item of business, when applicable.

If there were more ayes than noes, the chair says, for example, “The ayes have it, and the motion is adopted. The Tennis League will establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. The next item of business is…” [or, if nothing is set automatically to come up next, “Is there further new business?”].

On the other hand, if the noes prevailed, the chair says, “The noes have it and the motion is lost. The next item of business is …” [or, if nothing is set automatically to come up next, “Is there further new business?”]. [RONR (12th ed.) 4:41–49.]


Announcement of Voting Result and the Business That Follows
CHAIR: The ayes have it, and the motion is adopted. The Tennis League will establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. Is there further new business?

OR

The noes have it, and the motion is lost. Is there further new business?


Review: Example of Handling a Simple Motion

MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: I move that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. [Sits when finished.]
ANOTHER MEMBER [Seated]: Second!
CHAIR: It is moved and seconded that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools.
MEMBER A [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mr. A.
MEMBER A: We need to bring young people into tennis to keep the sport alive…. [Sits.]
MEMBER B [Stands]: Madam President!
CHAIR: Mrs. B.
MEMBER B: Most of our members are adults. High school students should establish their own league. . . . [Sits when finished.]
CHAIR: Is there any further debate?… The question is on the adoption of the motion that the Tennis League establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. Those in favor of the motion, say aye.
SOME MEMBERS [Seated]: Aye!
CHAIR: Those opposed, say no.
OTHER MEMBERS [Seated]: No!
CHAIR: The ayes have it, and the motion is carried. The Tennis League will establish a division open to juniors and seniors enrolled in city high schools. Is there further new business? OR The noes have it, and the motion is lost. Is there further new business?


Bibliography
Robert, Henry M. ; Honemann, Daniel H; Balch, Thomas J; Seabold, Daniel E.; Gerber, Shmuel. Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised In Brief, 3rd edition (pp. 19-22). PublicAffairs. Kindle Edition.